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Suez Canal crisis latest – ‘Egyptian mummy’s CURSE to blame for stranded ship after plan to move ancient Pharoah’s tomb’


THE giant container ship that blocked the Suez Canal may have fallen victim to an Ancient Egyptian mummy’s curse, it has been claimed.

Social media is abuzz with sinister theories after the 400m-long Ever Given became wedged in the shipping lane conditions on Tuesday last week.

Although the official cause is high winds causing the ship to run aground, some have linked the Suez crisis to two other mysterious incidents in Egypt last week – following a controversial decision about Pharoahs’ tombs.

Officials are planning on transport 22 royal mummies – including the remains of King Ramses II and Queen Ahmose-Nefertari – from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Fustat on April 3.

Shortly after news of the mummy move emerged, the Ever Given ran aground in the canal, a 10-story building collapsed at Suez Bridge, a fatal train accident took place, and several fires broke out across the country.

A millennia-old legend suggests anyone who disturbs Ancient Egyptian mummies will be hit by a curse that was laid upon the remains by priests during their burials thousands of years ago.

Yesterday the giant container was finally freed – but it will take days before the traffic jam it caused is finally cleared.

Follow our live blog below for all the latest Suez Canal news and updates…

  • JAM SHOULD BE CLEARED WITHIN NEXT ‘THREE TO FOUR DAYS’

    A backlog of more than 400 boats should be cleared within the next “three to four days”, the Suez Canal Authority has said.

    The average number of vessels passing through the canal each day is 93 – which is why hundreds of ships are currently trapped around the stuck Ever Given.

    Some 19,000 vessels passed through the canal last year, according to official figures.

  • SUEZ CANAL BACK IN BUSINESS TODAY

    A bumper maritime traffic jam of more than 400 vessels is now on the move through the Suez Canal.

    The traffic jam was caused when the Ever Given, leased by a Taiwan-based shipping company, was jammed diagonally across a section of the canal.

    The blockage cut all traffic along the shortest shipping route between Europe and Asia – reportedly costing shipping companies millions of dollars in losses each day.

    An estimated 15% of the world’s shipping traffic passes through the canal. According to the authority the blockage cost it around $15 million a day.

     

  • HOW BIG IS THE BACKLOG OF BOATS?

    At least 369 vessels were waiting – and many still are – to transit the canal, including dozens of container ships, bulk carriers and oil and gas tankers.

    Some ships had decided to reroute their cargoes around the Cape of Good Hope, adding about two weeks to journeys and extra fuel costs.

    Crude oil prices fell after news the ship had been refloated with Brent crude down by $1 per barrel to $63.67.

  • SATELLITE PICTURES FROM SPACE SHOWS MONSTER CARGO SHIP WEDGED IN CANAL

    Yesterday, satellite data showed the mega-ship had finally been straightened after its rear end was moved thanks to high tides brought on by a supermoon.

    Canal officials said the skyscraper-sized boat had been turned “80 per cent in the right direction” after the stern was shifted with “pulling manoeuvres” that moved it 335ft from the bank.

    The megaship was this morning being towed to the middle of the waterway and toward the Great Bitter Lake, a wide stretch of water halfway between the north and south end of the canal.

  • HOW WAS THE EVER GIVEN FREED?

    Rescue crews freed the vessel using tug boats and digging, even as analysts warned the monster vessel may be too heavy for such an operation.

    The salvage team dredged beneath the vessel’s bow with high pressure water jets to wrench the ship from the clay, said Berdowski.

    Eleven tugboats were helped by several diggers which vacuumed up sand underneath at high tide brought on by a “supermoon”.

    The full moon raises the water level due to its gravitational pull on the earth, canal services firm Leth Agencies said.

  • FIRST SHIPS PASS THROUGH SUEZ CANAL AFTER EVER GIVEN FREED

    The first cargo ships successfully passed through the Suez Canal yesterday evening. after the Ever Given mega-ship blocking it was finally freed.

    Rescuers released the front end of the monster cargo boat at around 4.30am after it was wedged in the vital shipping route for nearly a week.

    And long-awaited action was finally recorded in the waterway last night, with ship tracking website Maritime Traffic counting a number of vessels passing through.

    A Hong Kong-flagged cargo ship, the “YM Wish,” was the first vessel allowed through and exited the southern end at around 9:15 p.m. EDT in the U.S, The New York Times reports.

    It was said to be headed to the Red Sea and Jedda, the Saudi Arabian port city.

  • HOW MUCH DOES IT COST FOR A SHIP TO PASS THROUGH THE SUEZ CANAL?

    The Suez Canal is one of the world’s most important routes, and it’s costing $400million per hour in delayed goods, Lloyd’s List reported.

    The canal, which runs through Egypt, provides a vital shipping route that connects Europe to Asia.

    Lloyd’s List, a London-based shipping-news journal, estimated the value of cargo goods passing through the canal every day at $9.7billion on average, with $5.1billion travelling west and $4.6billion travelling east.

    The average number of vessels passing through the canal each day is 93 – which is why hundreds of ships are currently trapped around the stuck Ever Given.

    Some 19,000 vessels passed through the canal last year, according to official figures.

  • INSURANCE INDUSTRY BRACES FOR CLAIMS

    The insurance industry is bracing for claims taken out on the containers stacked high on the Ever Given.

    Potentially thousands of insurance policies taken out on the steel boxes could result in millions of dollars in payouts, Bloomberg reported.

    Taiwan’s Evergreen Line, which chartered the Ever Given, said the ship’s owner, Shoie Kisen Kaisha Ltd, was responsible for any losses.

    While the shipowner has taken some responsibility, it has said that charterers needed to deal with the cargo owners.

  • SALVAGE CHIEF PRAISES TEAM

    The boss of the salvage firm who was given the task of rescuing the Ever Given has praised his workers.

    Peter Berdowski, chief executive of Boskalis, said in a statement: “Shortly following the grounding of the Ever Given we were requested through SMIT Salvage to provide assistance with the salvage operation.

    “I am excited to announce that our team of experts, working in close collaboration with the Suez Canal Authority, successfully refloated the Ever Given on 29 March at 3.05pm local time, thereby making free passage through the Suez Canal possible again.

    “I’m extremely proud of the outstanding job done by the team on site as well as the many SMIT Salvage and Boskalis colleagues back home to complete this challenging operation under the watchful eye of the world.

    “The time pressure to complete this operation was evident and unprecedented.”

  • CLEARING BACKLOG OF SHIPS COULD TAKE AT LEAST 10 DAYS

    If the Ever Given is freed in the next few days, clearing the backlog of ships would take at least 10 days, data firm Refinitiv has said.

    The 400m-long Ever Given became wedged in the shipping lane due to extreme weather conditions last Tuesday.

    It has been holding up £6.5billion a day in global trade.

    Canal officials said the Ever Given had been turned “80 per cent in the right direction” after the stern was shifted with “pulling manoeuvres” that moved it 335ft from the bank.

  • HOW WAS THE EVER GIVEN REFLOATED?

    Satellite data earlier today showed the Ever Given has been straightened after its rear end was moved thanks to high tides brought on by a supermoon.

  • SATELLITE PICTURES FROM SPACE SHOWS MONSTER CARGO SHIP WEDGED IN CANAL

    The boat had been blocking the trading route since last Tuesday
    The boat had been blocking the trading route since last Tuesday
  • UNCLEAR WHEN SUEZ CANAL WILL OPEN TO OTHER BOATS

    The mega-ship longer than the Eiffel Tower blocking the Suez Canal has finally been refloated.

    Yet, it remains unclear when the major trading route will reopen again for the hundreds of others boats waiting to pass through.

    Clearing the backlog of ships could take at least 10 days, data firm Refinitiv has said.

  • EVER GIVEN FINALLY SAILS THROUGH THE SUEZ CANAL

    The Ever Given finally sails through the Suez Canal after a mammoth effort to free the megaship
    The Ever Given finally sails through the Suez Canal after a mammoth effort to free the megaship
  • WHEN DID THE EVER GIVEN BECOME STUCK?

    The 200,000-tonne vessel, which carries cargo between Asia and Europe, became stuck in a single-lane stretch of the canal last Tuesday.

    High winds are understood to have blown the boat, which was en route to the Netherlands from China, across the narrow canal that runs between Africa and the Sinai Peninsula.

    With canal transits stopped, Egypt already has lost over $95 million in revenue, according to Refinitiv.

  • WHEN DID THE EVER GIVEN BECOME STUCK?

    The 200,000-tonne vessel, which carries cargo between Asia and Europe, became stuck in a single-lane stretch of the canal last Tuesday.

    High winds are understood to have blown the boat, which was en route to the Netherlands from China, across the narrow canal that runs between Africa and the Sinai Peninsula.

    With canal transits stopped, Egypt already has lost over $95 million in revenue, according to Refinitiv.

  • WHEN DID THE EVER GIVEN BECOME STUCK?

    The 200,000-tonne vessel, which carries cargo between Asia and Europe, became stuck in a single-lane stretch of the canal last Tuesday.

    High winds are understood to have blown the boat, which was en route to the Netherlands from China, across the narrow canal that runs between Africa and the Sinai Peninsula.

    With canal transits stopped, Egypt already has lost over $95 million in revenue, according to Refinitiv.

  • CLEARING BACKLOG OF SHIPS COULD TAKE AT LEAST 10 DAYS

    If the Ever Given is freed in the next few days, clearing the backlog of ships would take at least 10 days, data firm Refinitiv has said.

    The 400m-long Ever Given became wedged in the shipping lane due to extreme weather conditions last Tuesday.

    It has been holding up £6.5billion a day in global trade.

    Canal officials said the Ever Given had been turned “80 per cent in the right direction” after the stern was shifted with “pulling manoeuvres” that moved it 335ft from the bank.

  • EVER GIVEN BEING TOWED TOWARDS GREAT BITTER LAKE

    Officials said that rescuers have successfully freed the front end of the Ever Given.

    The ship is now being towed to the middle of the waterway and toward the Great Bitter Lake, a wide stretch of water halfway between the north and south end of the canal.

    Once there, the ship will undergo a technical examination, officials said.

    Peter Berdowski, CEO of Dutch firm Boskalis which is helping in the rescue effort, announced the freeing of the ship.

    He said: “I am excited to announce that our team of experts,
    working in close collaboration with the Suez Canal Authority, successfully
    refloated the Ever Given on 29 March at 15:05 hrs local time, thereby making free passage through the Suez Canal possible again.”

  • ‘AT LEAST TWO DAYS’ BEFORE CANAL REOPENS, TANKER CAPTAIN PREDICTS

    The captain of the Ithaki warrior, a crude oil tanker from Greece affected by the blockage, says even in the most optimistic scenario it would take at least two days before the canal reopened.

    “We’ve basically lost the day,” said Symeon Nollas.

    “They’ll have to take the ship to the [artifical] Great Lakes and that will take at least five hours. Not before tomorrow, or even the day after tomorrow, will traffic be able to resume through the canal.”  

    Sixteen Greek tankers and bulk carriers had been held up by the crisis, along with hundreds of other ships.

  • SALVAGE CHIEF PRAISES TEAM

    The boss of the salvage firm who were given the task of rescuing the Ever Given praised workers.

    Peter Berdowski, chief executive of Boskalis, said in a statement: “Shortly following the grounding of the Ever Given we were requested through SMIT Salvage to provide assistance with the salvage operation.

    “I am excited to announce that our team of experts, working in close collaboration with the Suez Canal Authority, successfully refloated the Ever Given on 29 March at 3.05pm local time, thereby making free passage through the Suez Canal possible again.

    “I’m extremely proud of the outstanding job done by the team on site as well as the many SMIT Salvage and Boskalis colleagues back home to complete this challenging operation under the watchful eye of the world.

    “The time pressure to complete this operation was evident and unprecedented.”

  • ‘CLAPS, WHISTLES AND JUBILATION ALL AROUND’

    The man known as ‘Guy with The Digger At Suez Canal’ has tweeted that he was happy and relieved after the Ever Given was freed.

  • EVER GIVEN IS FREE

    A Suez Canal service firm says the Ever Given has been set free and is on the move.

  • BREAKING: SUEZ CANAL

    Ever Given is finally free. More to come.

  • UNCLEAR WHEN SUEZ CANAL WILL OPEN TO OTHER BOATS

    The mega-ship longer than the Eiffel Tower blocking the Suez Canal has been partially refloated thanks to high tides brought on by a supermoon.

    Photos showed the Ever Given had straightened after its stern had swung towards the canal bank.

    Yet, it remains unclear when the major trading route will reopen again for the hundreds of others boats waiting to pass through.

    Officials said that while the boat has been partially refloated, rescuers were still working to get the ship moving again.

    Peter Berdowski, CEO of Dutch firm Boskalis which is helping in the rescue effort, said the front end of the boat still needs to be freed.

    He said: “We have movement, which is good news. But I wouldn’t say it’s a piece of cake now.

    He added that the most difficult part of the operation was hauling the mammoth boat over the clay of the canal bank.





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